Final part: How I became a pilot

Final part: How I became a pilot
19/03/2017 pilotpatrick
how i became a pilot

Welcome on board my Aviator! Now sit back, relax and enjoy the last part of my series how I became a pilot. In my previous blog post, you read about my instrument flight training abroad in Vero Beach, Florida. In this final blog post of my series, you will read about the multi-engine flight training at Pilot Training Network and about a shocking crash at end of my training.

How I became a pilot

In my previous blog posts, you can read:

how i became a pilot

Being the back seater on a flight lesson with the PA44

Back in Zadar

The final and most important flight training phase took place back in Zadar, where my practical flight training started in summer 2008. At this stage, I had to recall the entire knowledge and skills I gather over the past one and a half years and transfer it to the final training flights. It was the most difficult phase since we had to fly a more complex aircraft with two piston engine. The Piper PA44 is multi-engine four seater aircraft. All flights were conducted under instrument flight rules and we practiced flying a multi-engine. Most of the time we rather flew the aircraft with one than with both engines. This required to fly the aircraft really precise and you need to apply sufficient rudder to control it along the desired flight path.

losinj airport

Losinj island in the Adrian Sea with a 700m runway

Piper Pa44 how i became a pilot

PA44 cockpit with Avidyne avionics (glass cockpit)

On August 31 2009 I had my final check flight with an examiner of the german authority. I was very nervous on this day because I had to pass this practical check to become a pilot. This flight took place from Zadar to Pula and back via Losinj. It lasted over 2,5 hours. Not only my flight skills were challenged but also my knowledge about the EU OPS. This regulation specifies minimum safety standards and related procedures for commercial passenger and cargo fixed-wing aviation. I was so happy that I passed the final check.

how i became a pilot

Celebrating the passed check with a jump into the Adrian sea with my flight overall

how i became a pilot

Piper PA44 seminole aircraft

The crash

Back in Germany we celebrated a birthday of a fellow flight student when a shocking news crashed the party. The Piper PA44, which I flew days ago, crashed into the Adrian Sea. The search and rescue team needed two days until they found the wreckage at the bottom of the sea in 68 m depth. During that time no one knew what has happened to the crew.  Unfortunately the flight instructor and the flight student died during the crash. This was so socking to hear and I could not believe it at the beginning. Usually those flight missions are flown with a student as back seater. But on this day he was late so they took off without him. As investigators found out in the end that the aircraft got into spin during the demonstration of a speed which called Vmca.

island shaped like a heart

Heart shaped island in the vicinity of the crash – RIP

What is a spin and the Vmca?

Vmca  is the minimum control speed in the air. This is the minimum speed at which a straight flight path can be maintained when an engine fails or is inoperative and the other engine is set to maximum thrust. At this point the rudder (vertical fin at the end of the airplane) is used to counter the asymetrical thrust and to maintain directional control (heading). If flying a speed less than Vmca the aircraft enters a spin. A spin is a special form of stall resulting in the rotation about the vertical axis. A stall means that the wing does not produce lift anymore. The aircraft autorotates toward the stalled wing due to the higher drag and loss of lift. Recovery may require a specific and counteractive set of actions to avoid a crash.

During my flight training the Vmca speed was demonstrated at a save altitude in a dedicated airspace for air work. When flown correctly this procedure is absolutely save. On this special day multiple factors led to the catastrophic crash. If you are interested you can read the full investigation report here (only in German)

forces acting on aircraft flying single engine
aircraft axis

The three axis of an aircraft

PA44 instruments how i became a pilot

Conventional instruments on a Piper PA44 wit the basic T (speed, attitude, altimeter, heading)

MCC

MCC stands for Multi Crew Coordination. This course is a requirement to fulfill the requirements to apply for a commercial pilot license (CPL). This course is constructed to rather teach the coordination and procedures of a multi crew cockpit than actually flying the aircraft. So far I have controlled all training aircraft by myself without an additional crew member. This means I flew the aircraft, did the radio communication and felt decisions by myself. This course is done in a simulator. I could choose between the Boeing B737 and the Airbus A320. I picked the Airbus since I always wanted to know how it feels like to fly a side stick. 

The entire MCC course consisted of 5 session each 4 hours. We had to study the basic operation procedures of the Airbus and had to get used to operating the aircraft as a Tea. It is was an exceptional feeling to fly a big and fast aircraft even though it was only the simulator at the stage. In my blog post “My Airbus A300 type rating” I already described how realistic the full flight simulators of Lufthansa Aviation Training are. After the completion of the course I was even more eager to get into the air with a big bird.

how i became a pilot

MCC flight training in the Lufthansa A320 simulator

Graduation Dinner

In October 2009 the last three courses of the flight school came together to celebrate the graduation from flight school. I was really happy about my accomplishment on one hand and on the other I was sad that a memorable time as flight student was over. It was a demanding and tough time. I had to study a lot, did not have much free time and I had to cope with a lot of pressure. My diligence paid off in the end.

At this time I was the flight student who passed the final written exam at the LBA the best. I did not know about it until I was exceptionally honored for this during the celebration event. My flight school invited me to fly from Frankfurt to Zürich in the cockpit of an Avro Jet. That was an amazing experience at the end of my time as flight student. It would take another three weeks until I finally received my pilot license.

how i became a pilot

Intercockpit course E308 Graduation dinner in 2009

In total my flight training lasted less than 2 years. During that time I flew about 210 hours  and made 258 landings.

The crash in Zadar showed me how vulnerable we are and how fast a happy life can be over. That is why it is so important to enjoy every day as if it was your last. Positive mind. Positive life. Happy landings.

In which cockpit would you love to fly in?

Your Pilot Patrick

21 Comments

  1. Anicka 8 months ago

    Hello Patrick. I really like you posts and photos. Your column “How I became a pilot” is amazing, you are showing us the process how to became a pilot.. it seems really hard, but you are showing us that it’s also fun I also like your lifestyle blokposts, because I’m on a same wave.. I love healthy lifestyle, I tried your breakfast idea and it was delicious. Thank you.

    • Author
      pilotpatrick 8 months ago

      Hello Anicka,
      thanks a lot. Makes me happy to read this nice feedback. That is really cool that you tried my breakfast recipe. Check my new blog post about my healthy superfoods and the recipe about the coconut raw balls. they are delicious.
      Happy landings! Patrick

  2. mingming2017 8 months ago

    so glad that your blog has a huge great progress and thank you for this post , it’s a motivated
    article to teach me keep my dream!

    • Author
      pilotpatrick 8 months ago

      Thanks for your comment. It makes me really happy to hear. Always keep it up. Check also my new blog post on methods how to save money for your dream.
      All the best and happy landings! Patrick

  3. Ester 8 months ago

    Hi Patrick. I love your blog and I follow you time ago… I wanna ask you if you could recommend me some books about aviation, but not just about history aviation… more than that please. I love aviation and airplanes 🙂
    I really hope your answer. Thanks a lot!

    Ester

    • Author
      pilotpatrick 8 months ago

      Hello Ester,
      thanks a lot for your nice words. I have a book about a timeline of aviation industry. I read the book about Captain Sully and the landing in the Hudson river some years ago. That was quite interesting. Would you want to read about aviation knowledge?
      Happy landings! Patrick

  4. Sara 8 months ago

    Auf ein neues :D. Huhu Patrick, woran macht man es abhängig, wie tief ein Flugzeug im Landeanflug fliegt ?
    Lg .Sara

    • Author
      pilotpatrick 8 months ago

      Hallo Sara,
      danke für dein Kommentar. Das ist wirklich eine sehr gute Frage, die ich dir gerne beantworte. An den meisten großen Flughäfen gibt es ein ILS (Instrumenten Landesystem) Das musst du dir wie folgt vorstellen: Es gibt ein vertikalen und horizontalen Leitstrahl, der vom Piloten verfolgt werden muss, um die Landebahn zu “treffen” und genügend Abstand zu Hinternissen zu haben. Der Leitstrahl ist standardmäßig auf 3 Grad eingestellt. Das heisst das Flugzeug nährt sich auf einem 3 Grad Gleitweg der Landebahn. Ich hoffe, dass ich deine Frage gut beantwortet habe!
      Happy landings!
      Patrick

  5. rapha 8 months ago

    Hello captain!

    Does CAE Oxford aviation is a good school to become a pilot because i’m not germanique so it risqus to be complicate…
    i will take my PPL during this hollydays .I’m a fan of aviation and i will go to the Bourget meeting in june in Paris and you? I would so be in your place! You ‘ re so Lucky enjoy! !!

    • Author
      pilotpatrick 7 months ago

      Hello Rapha,
      I am do not know anything about CAE oxford Aviation training. Good luck with the PPL! Keep up the hard work. i am not so sure about flight show in June.
      Happy landings!
      Patrick

  6. Patrick Grandl 8 months ago

    Hey Patrick, i read your blogs and i follow you also in instagram. I find your blogs cool and it motivated me to be a Pilot. I just have 3 questions i hope you will be able to answer them.
    1) i read your blog and you started at a easrly age, my question now is, i am 26, do i still have a Chance to be a commercial Pilot?

    2) i live also in germany now, my Deutschkenntnisse is good enough but my english is better, is still possible to study here in Deutschland in englisch?

    3) i have a lot of questions and fears in my mind especially im not that ypoung anymore. What do you think i should do? It might be a stupid question but maybe you have a idea

    LG Patrick G.

    • Author
      pilotpatrick 7 months ago

      Hello Patrick!
      Thanks for following! 🙂
      1) Yes of course! 26 is not too old to become a pilot.
      2) I am pretty sure that there are flight schools which offer courses in English only. My flight training at Pilot training was for example in english only.
      3) I can not decide for you. but keep in mind that flight training is really expansive and that it is not easy to find a job once you have your license. Maybe start with a PPL license to see if you could imagine flying for a living. Check
      All the best and I hope I could help.
      Happy landings!
      Patrick

  7. Daniel 7 months ago

    First: Congrats to your license! (just started reading your blog, or better said inhaling)
    Second: your school mate and teacher may RIP
    Third: would love to fly an A320. Just know it from the sim. Already checked on my list: B757 and A350

    • Author
      pilotpatrick 7 months ago

      Hello Daniel,
      thanks for your comment!
      Are you a commercial pilot? I have flown the A320 in the simulator as well. In real live it is better! 🙂
      Happy landings!
      Patrick

      • danieldaniel30 7 months ago

        Hey Patrick
        The B757 was a happy accident while traveling. Impressive, since I’m not used to B-cockpits.
        Unfortunatelly, I’m not a pilot, just a trainer for a/c systems and quality tech rep for a/c owner (Airbus a/c only).
        Wish you also always happy landings
        Daniel

  8. ghielyn 7 months ago

    Hi hello sir..hehe i just read how you become a pilot..and your amazing pilot student way back before hehe.. And how happy you are when you past ur exam..hehe i will continue read one by one of you blog post..im little behind hehe have a nice flight.. God bless.. Mr.pilot!

    • Author
      pilotpatrick 6 months ago

      Hello Ghielyn,
      thanks a lot for your support! All the best to you and please let me know if you have any questions!
      I always enjoy reading your comments. Sorry for the late reply this time.
      Happy landings
      Patrick

  9. ghielyn 7 months ago

    My second comment is not post..mmm

  10. Vasco 6 months ago

    Hi Pilot Patrick !
    Many thanks by doing these posts to help future aviators.
    Now I would like to know if you could answer these questions to me and for other future pilots !
    Can I ask you some things about aviation ? I would like to be a pilot too ( its my big dream ) in Lufthansa ( the best airline in the world ), but is very difficult , isn’t it ? Do you recommend to have a master degree before the ATPL License ?
    If a take a master degree , when I will finished i will be 22 , and after that I want to do the License ! It’s very old to take a license ? Or it’s better now with 18 years ? In your case when you finished the license, it takes how much time to get employed ? Did you stay employed at what age ? many thanks , and good flights ☺️!
    Vasco

    • Author
      pilotpatrick 4 months ago

      Hello Vasco,

      thanks for your comment. I am really sorry about my late reply. I have been quite busy lately, but I hope my answer reaches you still in time. Currently it is almost impossible to start a pilot career at Lufthansa. A lot of trainees have completed their flight training and are on a waitlist to start their cockpit job. This is due to the reorganisation of the company and the low cost airlines within Lufthansa. There ist still a demand of pilots (read my latest post about my reasons to becoming a pilot) If I were I would not fixate on Lufthansa.
      My recommendation is that you finish your degree and get a master. You are still very young and have enough time. The earliest time to start flying is 21. A pilot license remains a license and can not be compared with a college degree. You will notice that a degree can help you even when you become a pilot eventually. With this qualification you are able to become a postholder within an airline, etc.
      It took me about 10 months to find a job when I finished flight training. I was 22 years old at that time.

      I hope I could help you out. Please let me know if you have any further questions!

      Happy landings from Helsinki.

      Patrick

      • Vasco 4 months ago

        Hello Pilot Patrick,
        I’m very grateful about your opinion. Is very important because in these weeks I have to decide what I’m going to do.( And for others people in my situation .) Take now de ATPL license or take first a master degree,( I think I’m gonna take the master degree first( so I have something to do if the career goes wrong ) and then become a pilot ( my biggest dream)).
        Many thanks Pilot Patrick !
        Happy landings!

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